9 Amazon Prime Perks You Might Be Missing Out On

iStock.com/jahcottontail143
iStock.com/jahcottontail143

From diapers to camera equipment to jewelry, you can buy just about anything on Amazon and have it delivered to your doorstep in a matter of days—or in some cases, even hours. If you buy from the retailer often enough, its Prime service, which offers free two-day shipping, will save you far more than the $119 it costs to subscribe.

Your Prime membership offers a lot more than free shipping, though. To get even more out of Prime, don't forget to take full advantage of all its extra perks.

1. Photo Storage

Woman on computer next to camera
iStock.com/vgajic

One of the most convenient perks of your Prime membership is unlimited photo storage on Amazon Drive. You can add photos from your phone or computer and access them from your devices. You also have the option to back up those photos automatically with the Amazon Photos app. This way, you can free up precious storage space on your phone. Amazon says it doesn't adjust or reduce the quality of your images, either.

In addition to unlimited photo storage, Prime members also get 5 GB of data storage for free, which is useful for saving videos and other files.

2. Grocery Delivery

A grocery cart on top of iPhone
iStock.com/adventtr

With Prime Pantry, you can skip the supermarket and have grocery staples delivered to your door. For a flat fee of $5.99, you can order all the kitchen, household, and pet care items you can fit in a box. Each time you add an order to your virtual Pantry box, Amazon will tell you how much room you have left. And if the order is over $35, Prime members get free delivery.

3. Music, Movies, and TV Shows

Amazon Prime Video app on Apple TV
iStock.com/marcoventuriniautieri

Prime members also get access to Prime Video, where they can find a huge selection of free movies and TV shows, including its original programming. Similarly, Prime Music includes a massive collection of streaming music from top artists. The songs are ad-free and you can download them to your device in order to listen to them even when you’re not connected to data.

Prime also gives away free entertainment credits via its “no-rush shipping” option. Your Prime membership comes with free two-day shipping, but if you choose a later delivery date, you can score digital credits toward eBooks, music, videos, and apps.

4. Free Kindle eBooks

A Kindle Paperwhite on display
David McNew, Getty Images

If you're a Prime member with a Kindle e-reader or Fire tablet, you also have access to the Kindle Owners' Lending Library. It's like a digital public library that offers access to hundreds of thousands of books.

The catch is that you can only borrow one title a month, and the available titles change every month. However, there are no due dates, so if it takes you a few months to finish a book, you don't have to worry about late fees.

5. Steeper Discounts on Some Products

baby products
iStock.com/Steve Debenport

If you have a young child or infant, you can score discounts on supplies with Amazon Family, which offers 20 percent off certain product subscriptions (like diapers and baby food) through Amazon Subscribe & Save. If you use Amazon Family to register for gifts, you also get a 15 percent completion discount on some items, which basically means you'll get a price cut on any items left on your registry.

Even if you’re not a parent, Amazon's Subscribe & Save option can help cut the cost of certain products. You get up to 15 percent off household items when you opt to receive at least five of those products periodically—you set the schedule, so you decide whether that new bag of dog food is delivered every week or month.

6. Early Access to Deals

Amazon homepage
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Amazon's Lightning Deals can be hit or miss, but if you have Prime, you can scope them out early. Amazon allows Prime members to check out what's on sale 30 minutes before anyone else, which can help you snag popular items that will sell out fast.

And on Amazon Prime Day, Prime members are privy to even more deals.

7. Two-Hour Delivery

Scarlett Moffatt of Gogglebox with Prime Now package
Andrew Benge, Getty Images for Amazon

If you need something in a rush, Amazon will ship items from local stores, depending on your Zip code, with free two-hour delivery. This service is called Prime Now, and it is, of course, only available to Prime customers. It includes over 10,000 items, many of which are household staples like cleaning products, toiletries, and food. However, it also includes some electronics like video games, chargers, and computer accessories.

After acquiring Whole Foods in 2017, Amazon has added the grocery chain to its Prime Now service in select cities, too. They're testing Whole Foods delivery in a number of major metro areas before rolling it out nationwide.

8. Twitch Prime

Hands on a controller playing a video game
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Twitch is a live video streaming service for gamers. And since Amazon purchased the company in 2014, you can now get Twitch Prime membership for free with Amazon Prime.

Each month, Twitch members get "free game loot," which includes access to a new game. You can also watch other gamers stream their videos ad-free, and you get one free channel subscription every 30 days. If you already have Amazon Prime, you simply need to link your account to Twitch Prime.

9. Amazon Elements

Amazon Elements Baby Wipes
Amazon

For the socially conscious shopper, Amazon launched Amazon Elements, a shopping portal that includes a line of "premium products."

With Amazon Elements, Amazon only partners with suppliers that meet its "high-quality and safety standards." For now, the selection of products on Elements is scarce. Categories are limited to vitamins and baby wipes. You can dig deeper into the sourcing of these products, though, and review the item's quality report as well as ingredient and product origins via the Amazon app.

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

10 Simple Ways to Reduce Food Waste

Learn how to make the most of your grocery haul.
Learn how to make the most of your grocery haul.
GANNAMARTYSHEVA/iStock via Getty Images

With the novel coronavirus majorly disrupting the food service industry, billions of dollars’ worth of food is going to waste as farmers face an overwhelming surplus of perishable items like dairy and fresh vegetables, according to a recent article in The Guardian. Thanks to a scrambled supply chain, nearly half of the food grown in the United States that was previously destined for school cafeterias, restaurants, theme parks, cruise ships, and stadiums is going to waste, with farmers being forced to dump fresh milk and plow vegetables back into the dirt. To better preserve your own supplies—and save some serious cash—check out these 10 ways to reduce food waste at home.

1. Store your food properly.

Correctly storing your food will help it stay fresh longer. If your bread typically molds or goes stale before you have the chance to finish the loaf, keep half of it in the bread box and freeze the other half for later. Store potatoes and tomatoes at room temperature. Don’t stash your eggs in the refrigerator door compartment—this will rattle them around, and may lead to a yolky mess. You can find more helpful food storing tips here.

2. Get well-acquainted with your freezer.

Freezer packed with food
Stuffing your freezer means you can also pass time with a quality game of freezer Tetris.
mliu92, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Leftovers, especially meals like soups or stews, are excellent for freezing. But you can freeze individual ingredients, too. Freeze wilted spinach to add to future soups. Frozen berries work well in smoothies, and frozen overripe bananas are perfect for banana bread. Keeping a bag of vegetable scraps in the freezer is a great way to ensure you’ll always have the ingredients for vegetable stock on hand (more on that later). However, there are some foods you should never freeze, and there are certain things you shouldn’t do when defrosting.

3. Learn the best way to freeze different kinds of fruit.

Ripe, fairly unblemished fruit is best for freezing. First, wash the fruit and sort through it for any pieces that are bruised or rotten. Some fruits, like blackberries, raspberries, and plums [PDF], will freeze better with the help of a sugar solution, though cranberries, blueberries, and currants typically do fine on their own. Arrange more delicate berries like strawberries or raspberries in a single layer on a baking sheet (you can also coat them with sugar or a sugar syrup), and then once they’re frozen, put them in a container or a plastic freezer bag. Fruits that tend to brown, like peaches, apple, apricots, and nectarines, can be treated with ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), which you can purchase in powder form in health food stores and some grocery stores.

4. Follow the “first in, first out” rule.

Much like shelves are stocked in grocery stores, use the “first in, first out” method when stocking your refrigerator. After washing your produce and wiping down all other items, put the newer ingredients in the back of the fridge and move the older items to the front so they’ll get used first. A fridge cam can even help you keep track of what’s about to go bad or expire.

5. Keep your fridge uncluttered.

Woman standing in front of opened fridge pinching her nose
Maintaining an orderly fridge will help you spot spoiling food before it starts to stink.
millann/iStock via Getty Images

Having to rummage around for an item or not being able to see that bottle of cocktail sauce tucked behind the box o’ wine means more food may go bad before it’s used up. Periodically, take a look at the long-term residents of your fridge, like salad dressings and sauces, to see if they’re still good. If possible, keep them all in one spot to make keeping track of them easier. Also, use square containers for leftovers rather than round ones, as the square shape allows for more storage space. Taking stock of everything you have in both the fridge and the pantry before shopping will also help cut down on clutter and double-buying.

6. Understand expiration dates.

Studies have shown that we throw away more than half of the food we keep in our refrigerators. Misunderstanding food labels is one reason behind the waste. “Sell by” is the date used to inform retailers when an item should be sold or removed from inventory. “Best by” is a suggested date that shoppers should use their products by. Neither means the item is unsafe to eat after that particular date. Even “expires by” isn’t set in stone.

7. Use food scraps to make stock.

Using vegetable scraps like stalks, tops, and peels to make a tasty broth is simple. Sauté them in some butter or oil, then add water and let them simmer for a few hours. Simmer beef bones and chicken carcasses along with the veggies (add water and herbs) to make a delectable homemade broth.

8. Plan your meals in advance.

Knowing what you want to eat for just a few dinners or lunches per week can help you figure out which ingredients you can use across meals and help cut down on spontaneous buying. The Kitchn recommends planning on a Friday, shopping on a Saturday, and then using an hour on Sunday for meal prep.

9. Shop strategically.

Grocery shopping list written with pen on paper from a notebook
For now, it's best to write your shopping list on paper you can later dispose of.
Santeri Viinamäki, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

Typically, more frequent trips to the grocery store are preferable to buying in bulk when it comes to cutting down on waste, but in these current circumstances, less frequent trips are your safest bet. Therefore, a list is essential—just make sure you're jotting your notes on paper and not touching your phone while shopping. And if there’s any way to order online for delivery or pick-up, keeping an open online shopping cart is the best way to organize and maintain a visual list.

10. Donate items you know you won’t use to your local food bank.

If you have more food on hand than you need, consider donating to a local shelter or food bank. Call ahead and arrange curbside drop off.

6 Products That Can Help Improve Your Home's Air Quality

Guardian Technologies/Homasy/Amazon
Guardian Technologies/Homasy/Amazon

Chances are you’ve spent a lot more time than usual inside lately. And if you’ve noticed that the air in your home has started to feel a little mustier thanks to your constant presence, you might need to do a bit more than just crack a window. From air purifiers designed to filter out germs to all-natural surface cleaners that help you avoid harsh chemicals, we’ve compiled some essential products that will help improve your indoor air quality.

1. Vacuums with HEPA filters


Shark/Homasy/Amazon

Carpets and rugs are bound to absorb pollutants like dust and dirt that can keep the air in your home a little less than fresh and agitate your allergies. Research suggests that a vacuum equipped with a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter helps reduce surface contamination, and for the best results, the universal rule of thumb is to run a vacuum over the floors at least once a week. We recommend this upright vacuum from Shark ($170), which includes a lift-away feature so you can clean harder-to-reach locations. If you need a duster to complement your Shark, go with the Swiffer ($13); it's a simple design that can easily get around corners and fit under furniture, where colonies of dust tend to hang out.

If you're looking for a more hands-off approach to cleaning, Homasy's line of robot vacuums can be programmed to clean your floors right from a remote. The 1500PA ($166) model has a 4.4-star Amazon rating, features four cleaning modes (auto, wall, small-room, and suction cleaning), and sports a HEPA filter.

2. air purifiers

Guardian Technologies air purifier.
Guardian Technologies/Amazon

According to Good Housekeeping, you should look for an air purifier that’s verified by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) and uses the aforementioned HEPA-certified filters, which can catch about 99.97 percent of the smallest particles that cause allergies and other issues (be wary of brands selling "near-HEPA" products, though). For the best results, just make sure to replace the filter every three months.

This air purifier from Guardian Technologies ($97) has a built-in UV light that helps kill germs and a true HEPA filter that works to reduce odors. The company also offers a smart model ($148) that can be scheduled to go on and off through an app and is compatible with Alexa and Google Assistant.

3. humidifiers

A humidifier from Honeywell.
Honeywell/Amazon

Being stuck at home as the temperatures rise inevitably means your air conditioner will soon be working overtime. To combat the dry air that accompanies AC units, think about picking up a humidifier to add some much-needed moisture to your home. The Honeywell HCM-350 Germ-Free Cool Mist Humidifier ($64) comes with plenty of acclaim and is the perfect size for the bedroom or living room. It runs quietly, only needs a gallon of water, and can help bring some life to your home's stagnant, dry air. If you're not looking to make as big of an investment, there are personal humidifiers ($20) that can simply be dropped into a cup of water.

4. An air-quality monitor

Awair air-quality monitor on Amazon.
Awair/Amazon

Keep on top of your indoor air quality by purchasing a monitor that tracks humidity, temperature, and the presence of particulate matter. This monitor from Awair ($69) plugs into an outlet and sends you real-time updates through a connected app. You can even plug another device into it—like a humidifier—and the monitor will automatically turn it on if air quality dips at all.

5. All-natural cleaning products

Puracy all-natural cleaners.
Puracy/Amazon

Many cleaning products contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which drastically impact indoor air quality and may produce negative health effects. Switch to all-natural cleaning products to avoid potentially toxic byproducts, especially when dealing with rooms that have poor ventilation. We recommend this plant-based, all-purpose spray from Puracy ($12), along with the company's line of carpet shampoo ($15) or the full-on cleaning set ($40) of all their major products.

6. Replacement air filters

Filtrete air filters on Amazon.
Filtrete/Amazon

Your home’s air filters will be most effective provided they’re cleaned or replaced on a regular schedule. Depending on where you live, how often you use your HVAC system, and the type of filter you use, you should aim to replace your filters every two to three months, according to The Spruce. However, you can change them every month to six weeks if you have issues like allergies and asthma.

This air filter from Filtrete ($32) contains an activated carbon layer designed to trap odors and particulate matter and is built to last for three months. The benefits of charcoal as an odor eater don't have to come at a high cost, either. You can grab some tiny air-purifying charcoal bags ($20) to throw into a car or shoe closet to help filter those unpleasant smells that you're probably tired of dealing with.

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

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