20 of the Most Successful Products from Shark Tank

ABC
ABC

Since premiering in 2009, Shark Tank has made a business out of making businesses. The highly-rated ABC series permits entrepreneurs to pitch their product ideas to a panel of potential investors that includes Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, “Queen of QVC” Lori Greiner, and acerbic Kevin O’Leary. Good products find encouragement and investment capital; questionable inventions face withering scorn and a long walk back to the dressing room.

Of the hundreds of items to be featured on the show, a relatively small percentage go on to success. (Many deals, in fact, dry up during the due diligence stage.) Here are 20 of the most successful to come out of 10 years of the Tank, including several that failed to entice the “Sharks” but still managed to make it big.

1. KODIAK CAKES

A model holds up a box of Kodiak Cakes pancake mix
Kodiak Cakes

It can be hard to break the habit people have reaching for Bisquick pancake mix, but Utah-based Kodiak Cakes is making an impressive effort in that direction. The flour-based mix—which adds more whole grains and protein than your average grocery store offering—was featured on the show in 2013, with owner Joel Clark walking away empty-handed. (He didn’t want to give up more than 10 percent equity.) Bolstered by the attention and supported by health-conscious carb lovers, the company recorded $54 million in revenue in 2017 and is now the fourth largest pancake mix on shelves. You can also find their premade waffles and pancakes in freezer aisles. 

Buy it: Amazon; $14

2. READEREST

A model demonstrates the ReadeRest eyeglass clip
ReadeRest

Rick Hopper, a former supervisor at Home Depot, had his eureka moment in 2010 when he found himself misplacing his reading glasses. That frustration led to ReadeREST (“reader rest”), a magnetic pocket filler that allows glasses-wearers to clip their spectacles to their shirt when not in use. Unlike glasses kept loose in a pocket, the clip prevents them from slipping out and crashing to the floor when a person bends over. Hopper accepted an offer from Greiner and subsequently sold $100,000 in product the first time it appeared on QVC. They’ve since done over $27 million in sales.

Buy it: Amazon; $10

3. COUSINS MAINE LOBSTER

Cousins Maine Lobster co-founders pose for a photo with Queen Latifah
Cousins Maine Lobster

Hoping to bring an authentic Maine lobster roll experience to the West Coast, cousins Sabin Lomac and Jim Tselikis started their Cousins Maine Lobster food truck in Los Angeles in 2012. That success captured the interest of Shark Tank producers, who invited the two on the show. Shark Barbara Corcoran invested a total of $55,000, which helped facilitate a growing number of the trucks and led to total sales in excess of $20 million. Consumers outside of their vehicle reach can also order live, claw-snapping Maine lobsters from their website.

4. GROOVEBOOK

A screen shot that explains how the GrooveBook app works
GrooveBook

Print isn’t dead—at least, not print-on-demand. GrooveBook, an app that allows users to flag social media photos and request physical prints as part of a customized photo book, appeared on season five of Shark Tank and scored a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O’Leary. Prior to their appearance, owners Julie and Brian Whiteman had about 18,000 paid subscribers. Following the broadcast, that number rose to 500,000. In 2015, the company sold for $14.5 million to Shutterfly.

5. SQUATTY POTTY

The Squatty Potty sits next to a toilet
Squatty Potty

A plastic stool meant to facilitate more efficient emptying of the colon, the Squatty Potty made a splash when it was featured on the show in 2014. The company moved than $1 million in product in the 24 hours following broadcast—that was in addition to Greiner’s $500,000 investment. In 2016, the company topped $30 million sales. Creator Bobby Edwards cites his chronically constipated mother, Judy, as being the inspiration. Loads of other "toilet stools" have followed, and scientific papers have been written confirming that they do indeed help make pooping easier.

Buy it: Amazon; $25

6. GRACE AND LACE

A model wears a knee and boot accessory from Grace and Lace
Grace and Lace

A 2013 appearance and $175,000 investment by Corcoran led to this women’s accessory business owned by couple Rick and Melissa Hinnant growing from $1 million to over $20 million in sales. The expedited success left the owners scrambling to fill sock orders, which was met with some consternation by customers unhappy with the delays. (“I’m going to burn them,” wrote one impatient buyer.) Most of their orders come via their website, though they have a growing presence in boutique stores and on Amazon.

7. BUBBA’S Q

A bottle of Bubba's Q barbeque sauce sits next to a plate of ribs
Bubba's Q

Former NFL player Al “Bubba” Baker pitched his Bubba’s Q boneless ribs to the Tank in 2014, with Shark Daymond John seeing potential in Baker’s signature meat-and-sauce combination and agreeing to invest $300,000 for a 30 percent stake. The company went from doing $154,000 in sales prior to the show to $16 million in 2017. The ribs can be found online, in Costco, on QVC, and were also featured as part of a Carl’s Jr. menu. Baker owns patents on his process, making him the only person able to sell a deboned and cooked rib.

8. TIPSY ELVES

Models sport holiday sweaters from Tipsy Elves
Tipsy Elves

Ugly holiday sweaters might appear to belong only on thrift store shelves, but Tipsy Elves co-founders Nick Morton and Evan Mendelsohn managed to convince Shark Robert Herjavec to invest $100,000 for a 10 percent stake in their business during a 2013 appearance. Peddling the clothing—which feature hideously charming or charmingly hideous designs, depending on your perspective—has paid off for everyone, with sales exceeding $10 million in 2015. Three days before taping the show, Mendelsohn went to Panda Express and found a curious prediction in his fortune cookie: “An investment opportunity will find you.” You can find their products on Amazon.

9. RING

A Ring doorbell is mounted outside of a house
Ring

The doorbell-camera hybrid Ring recently sold to Amazon for $1.1 billion, but during a 2013 appearance, CEO James Siminoff faced a lineup of Sharks who could barely keep their eyes open. (Only one, O’Leary, even bothered to make an offer.) Mark Cuban later stated that he would decline the opportunity again if given the chance, citing a high valuation as a stumbling block. The Amazon sale also paid off for Shaquille O’Neal, who agreed to be a pitchman for the product in 2016 in exchange for equity.

Buy it: Amazon; $100

10. BEDJET

A BedJet device sits next to a mattress
BedJet

Few entrepreneurs have flamed out as spectacularly as former NASA employee Mark Aramli, who appeared on a 2015 episode touting his BedJet, a climate-controlling mattress pad that allows users to adjust to their preferred temperature. The Sharks disagreed with his $2.5 million valuation and $499 price tag. Greiner later tweeted she was “pissed off” by his disposition. No one wanted to get in bed with him, but Aramli got the last laugh with $3 million in sales in the 18 months following the broadcast.

Buy it: Amazon; $400

11. COPA DI VINO

A Copa di Vino wine glass is held up
Copa di Vino

It’s rare to score even one opportunity to make a product presentation on Shark Tank: Having two is almost unheard of. Copa Di Vino founder James Martin first appeared in 2011 with his idea for single-serve wine glasses that are sealed to maintain freshness. While he failed to find a partner, Martin still profited from the attention, going from $500,000 to $5 million in sales. That success led to a second invite in 2017. Again, the Sharks were less than fond of his brazen approach to negotiation. (He took sips from his own supply.) But Copa is still doing fine, selling 38 million cups through 2017.

12. SIMPLY FIT BOARD

A model demonstrates the Simply Fit exercise board
Amazon

Resembling something like a skateboard liberated from its wheels, the Simply Fit board is a core balance device meant to strengthen abdominal muscles. In a 2015 appearance, co-founders Gloria Hoffman and Linda Clark convinced Greiner that it was a wise investment, but Greiner felt she had to act fast: Without a patent, copycats would become a problem. Sales went from $575,000 to $9 million in a matter of months, with placement in Home Depot and Walmart locations.

Buy it: Amazon; $25

13. CHEF BIG SHAKE

The exterior of the Chef Big Shake restaurant
Chef Big Shake

Who doesn’t crave a juicy, delicious shrimp burger? All the Sharks, apparently, as this seafood offering failed to entice any investment offers when Shawn Davis pitched it in 2012. The exposure quickly led to offscreen offers for funding, however, and his Chef Big Shake banner went from $30,000 to $5 million in sales thanks in part to an expanded menu of chicken, popcorn, and other items. Davis originally formulated the patty for his pescatarian daughter, who is currently back to eating meat.

14. SCRUB DADDY

A person holds up a Scrub Daddy kitchen sponge
Your Best Digs, Flickr // CC BY 2.0 // YourBestDigs

In what is likely the single biggest nonedible success story to emerge from Shark Tank, inventor Aaron Krause convinced Greiner to invest $200,000 in his smiley-faced sponge. (The mouth is good for cleaning utensils.) But the Scrub Daddy is more than just a vessel to tackle dried-on chili from pans: Rinsed under hot water, it gets pliable enough to use on counters. Run it under cold and it firms up to tackle baked-on messes. Through 2017, Krause has sold more than 10 million sponges and logged $50 million in sales.

Buy it: Amazon; $10

15. DROP STOP

The packaging for the Drop Stop car accessory
Amazon

Is it the greatest invention since the light bulb? Or at least the Snuggie? The Drop Stop is a foam-filled log that fits in the crack between a car seat and the center console. If a passenger drops their car keys or other items in the “Carmuda Triangle,” they will still be within easy reach. Co-founders Marc Newburger and Jeffrey Simon appeared on the show in 2012, secured a deal, and went on to sell 2.4 million Drop Stops for $24 million in revenue.

Buy it: Amazon; $20

16. FiberFix

A roll of FiberFix repair tape is pictured
FiberFix

When duct tape won't do, FiberFix promises to offer a sticky solution. The ultra-durable adhesive tape hardens into a steel-like texture, creating a permanent and water-tight covering for repairs on most surfaces. Lori Greiner invested and has seen the company collect $50 million in sales since co-founders Spencer Quinn and Eric Child pitched the product in 2013.

Buy it: Amazon; $10

17. Bottle Breacher

A man holds up a Bottle Breacher bottle opener made out of a decommissioned .50 caliber bullet
Bottle Breacher

If nothing else, the Bottle Breacher is a conversation starter. The bottle openers are actually hand-crafted, decommissioned .50 caliber bullets and intended to be symbolic of military support. (Co-founder Eli Crane is a Navy SEAL and operates Bottle Breacher with his wife, Jen.) Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary invested in 2014 and watched as sales climbed from $150,000 to $15 million. A portion of revenue is directed toward a number of nonprofit military organizations.

Buy it: Amazon; $17

18. Mission Belt

A red Mission Belt is pictured
Mission Belt

This reinvention of the belt does away with notches and instead uses a release clasp to keep the strap tight around the waist. The Mission Belt comes in a variety of styles and colors and guarantees you'll never have a too-tight or too-loose fit. The accessory caught the attention of Shark Daymond John in 2012. Co-founders Zac Holzapfel and Jeff Jensen donate $1 of every belt sold to fund microloans for small businesses in developing countries. The company has reached over $25 million in sales.

Buy it: Amazon; $40-$47

19. InstaFire

The InstaFire fire starting kit is pictured
Amazon

Not everyone learned valuable fire-starting skills as a youth, which is where InstaFire comes in. The kits—which consist of volcanic rock, wood pellets, and paraffin wax—can produce flames up to 16 inches in height that will stay lit for up to 30 minutes. Mark Cuban and Lori Greiner invested a total of $300,000 in 2016. After beginning with $378,000 in sales prior to the show, InstaFire is on track to move $5 million in product in 2019. The company also plans on international expansion to roll out InstaFire-ready logs to cut down on deforestation in still-developing countries.

Buy it: Amazon; $2-$38

20. Safe Grabs

The Safe Grabs kitchen accessory is pictured
Safe Grabs

If you've ever burned your hands transporting a hot bowl of oatmeal or soup from the microwave, Safe Grabs is for you. Inventor Cyndi Lee had the idea after spending a lifetime nursing singed palms. The silicone mat is placed in the microwave underneath your reheated dish. When it's done, the mat acts as an oven mitt, insulating your hands from the steaming leftover plate. Safe Grabs has done over $5 million in sales since appearing on the show in 2016, where Lori Greiner invested $75,000.

Buy it: Amazon; $27

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41 Wonderful Facts About Mister Rogers

PBS Television, Getty Images
PBS Television, Getty Images

Fred Rogers remains an icon of kindness for the ages. An innovator of children’s television, his salt-of-the-earth demeanor and genuinely gentle nature taught a generation of kids the value of kindness. Just ahead of A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, a new biopic in which Tom Hanks stars everyone's favorite "neighbor," here are 41 things you might not have known about Fred Rogers.

1. Fred Rogers was bullied as a child.

A publciity image of David Newell (L) and Fred Rogers (R) from 'Mister Rogers' Neighborhood' is pictured
Focus Features

According to Benjamin Wagner, who directed the 2010 documentary Mister Rogers & Me—and was, in fact, Rogers’s neighbor on Massachusetts's Nantucket island—Rogers was overweight and shy as a child, and was regularly taunted by his classmates.

"I used to cry to myself when I was alone," Rogers said. “And I would cry through my fingers and make up songs on the piano."

2. Rogers left Dartmouth College after one year.

Rogers was an Ivy League dropout. He spent his freshman year at Dartmouth College, then transferred to Rollins College, where he pursued a degree in music.

3. He was an accomplished musician.

Fred Rogers in a still from 'Won't You Be My Neighbor?' (2018)
Focus Features

Rogers transferred to Rollins College in order to pursue a degree in music and graduated Magna cum laude. In addition to his talent for playing the piano, Rogers was also an incredible songwriter.

4. He wrote the music for Mister Rogers' Neighborhood.

Need proof of Rogers's songwriting prowess? He wrote all the songs for Mister Rogers' Neighborhood—plus hundreds more.

5. Playing the piano was his favorite stress-reducer.

Whenever Rogers began to feel anxious or overwhelmed, he would play the Mister Rogers' Neighborhood theme song on the piano as a way to calm his nerves.

6. He had a strict daily routine.

Rogers was a stickler when it came to his daily routine: He started his day at 5 a.m. and made time for a prayer as well as some studying, writing, phone calls, swimming, and responding to his fan mail.

7. He weighed himself daily.

Mister Rogers
Getty Images

Another part of Rogers's daily routine included a daily weigh-in. He liked to maintain a weight of exactly 143 pounds.

8. His weight had a special meaning.

Rogers's regular weight of 143 had special meaning to him. "It takes one letter to say I and four letters to say love and three letters to say you," Rogers once said. "One hundred and forty-three."

9. Pennsylvania celebrated 143 day in 2019.

In 2019, Pennsylvania governor Tom Wolf declared May 23 to be 143 Day in the state. Rogers was born near Pittsburgh and lived his whole life in the area. By honoring Rogers with his own holiday, the individuals behind the 143 Day campaign wanted to encourage people to be kind to their neighbors on May 23—and every other day of the year.

10. Rogers responded to every fan letter he received.

Rogers took time out of each day to respond to his fan mail, and he responded to each and every letter he received—approximately 50 to 100 letters per day. "He respected the kids who wrote," Heather Arnet, an assistant on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. “He never thought about throwing out a drawing or letter. They were sacred."

11. No feeling was too big—or small—for Mr. Rogers to talk about.

A promotional image of Fred Rogers for 'Mister Rogers' Neighborhood' is pictured
Amazon

Over the many years he worked with children, Rogers spoke very openly about his and their feelings on every sort of topic, from why kids shouldn't be afraid of haircuts to divorce and war.

12. He spent five episodes talking about nuclear war.

Since its inception on Pittsburgh's WQED in 1968, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood had informed its young audience about topical issues in subversive and disarming ways. When civil rights were discussed, host Fred Rogers didn’t deliver a lecture about tolerance. Instead, he invited a black friend, Officer Clemmons, to cool off in his inflatable pool, a subtle nod to desegregation.

Rogers conceived and taped a five-episode storyline on the subject in the summer of 1983, which wound up being prescient. In November 1983, president Ronald Reagan ordered the invasion of Grenada to topple a Marxist regime.

“Little did I know we would be involved in a worldwide conflict now,” Rogers told the Associated Press. “But that’s all the better because our shows give families an opportunity for communication. If children should hear the news of war, at least they have a handle here, to assist in family communications.”

13. Rogers had a special way of talking to kids.

Mr. Rogers knew children well. He knew how they thought, what they liked, what they feared, and what they struggled to understand—and he went to great lengths to ensure he never upset or confused his devoted viewers.Mr. Rogers knew children well. He knew how they thought, what they liked, what they feared, and what they struggled to understand—and he went to great lengths to ensure he never upset or confused his devoted viewers.

Maxwell King, author of the forthcoming book The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Rogers, wrote in The Atlantic that Mr. Rogers carefully chose his words while filming Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood. He understood that children think in a literal way, and a phrase that might sound perfectly fine to adult ears could be misinterpreted by younger audiences.

Rogers was “extraordinarily good at imagining where children’s minds might go,” King said, adding that Mr. Rogers wrote a song called “You Can Never Go Down the Drain” because he knew this might be a fear shared by many children.

14. Rogers used King Friday to make Friday the 13th less scary for kids.

King Friday XIII, son of King Charming Thursday XII and Queen Cinderella Monday, is an avid arts lover, a talented whistler, and a former pole vaulter. He reigns over Calendarland with lots of pomp and poise, and he’s usually correct.

Fans of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood may also remember that King Friday XIII, who reigned over Calendarland, was born on Friday the 13th, because his birthday was celebrated on the program every Friday the 13th. Though the math isn’t perfect—according to Timeanddate.com , Friday the 13th sometimes happens two or three times a year—the reason behind it absolutely is.

Rogers explained that he wanted to give children a reason to look forward to Friday the 13th, instead of buying into the negative superstitions that surround the dreaded date. “We thought, ‘Let’s start children out thinking that Friday the 13th was a fun day,’” he said in a 1999 interview. “So we would celebrate his birthday every time a Friday the 13th came.”

15. Rogers was an ordained Presbyterian minister.

Rogers was an ordained minister who preached tolerance wherever he went. When Amy Melder, a 6-year-old Christian viewer, sent Rogers a drawing she made for him with a letter that promised “he was going to heaven,” Rogers wrote back to his young fan:

“You told me that you have accepted Jesus as your Savior. It means a lot to me to know that. And, I appreciated the scripture verse that you sent. I am an ordained Presbyterian minister, and I want you to know that Jesus is important to me, too. I hope that God’s love and peace come through my work on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.”

16. Rogers was not a fan of foul language.

If Rogers used the word mercy, it probably meant that he was feeling overwhelmed. He was typically heard saying it when he sat down at his desk in the morning and saw the mountain of fan mail awaiting him. But mercy was about the strongest word in his vocabulary.

17. Rogers was not a fan of television, which is why he gravitated toward it.


Rogers’s decision to work in television wasn’t out of a love for the medium. "When I first saw children's television, I thought it was perfectly horrible," Rogers told Pittsburgh Magazine. "And I thought there was some way of using this fabulous medium to be of nurture to those who would watch and listen."

18. There's a reason why the stoplight is always yellow in the opening sequence to Mister Rogers' Neighborhood.

In the opening sequence of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, the stoplight is always on yellow as a reminder to kids—and their parents—to slow down a little.

19. Rogers believed that patience was a virtue—even if it meant dead air time.

Rogers wasn't afraid of dead air: He once invited a marine biologist onto the show and put a microphone into his fish tank, because he wanted the kids at home to see (and hear) that fish make sounds when they eat. While taping the segment, however, the fish weren't hungry so the marine biologist started trying to egg the fish on. But Rogers just sat there, waiting quietly. The crew figured they'd need to re-tape it, but Rogers didn't want to. He thought it was a great lesson in teaching kids the importance of being patient.

20. Rogers always made sure to announce that he was feeding his fish for a very specific reason.

Rogers always mentioned out loud that he was feeding his fish because a young blind viewer once asked him to do so. She wanted to know the fish were OK.

21. Rogers was not a fan of ad-libbing.

Rogers was a perfectionist, and very much disliked ad-libbing. He felt that he owed it to the kids who watched his show to make sure that every word on his show was thought out.

22. Kids who watched Mister Rogers' Neighborhood retained more than those who watched Sesame Street.

A Yale study pitted fans of Sesame Street against Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood watchers and found that kids who watched Mister Rogers tended to remember more of the story lines, and had a much higher “tolerance of delay,” meaning they were more patient.

23. Animals loved Rogers as much as people did.

It wasn’t just kids and their parents who loved Mister Rogers. Koko, the Stanford-educated gorilla who understood 2000 English words, was an avid fan, too. When Rogers visited once her, she immediately gave him a hug—and took his shoes off.

24. Rogers's mother knitted all of his sweaters.

If watching an episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood gives you sweater envy, we’ve got bad news: You’d never be able to find his sweaters in a store. All of those comfy-looking cardigans were knitted by Fred’s mom, Nancy. In an interview with the Archive of American Television, Rogers explained how his mother would knit sweaters for all of her loved ones every year as Christmas gifts. “And so until she died, those zippered sweaters I wear on the Neighborhood were all made by my mother,” he said.

25. One of rogers's sweaters lives in the Smithsonian.

In 1984, Rogers donated one of his iconic sweaters to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

26. Rogers's sweater collection was actually challenging to maintain.

Fred's mother, Nancy Rogers, died in 1981. Rogers continued wearing the sweaters she had made for years ... until it became obvious that they wouldn’t endure many more tapings of the show. Replacements were sought, but art director Kathy Borland quickly discovered that the search was not unlike trying to replace Superman’s cape. A Fred Rogers sweater needed a zipper with a smooth operation so it wouldn’t snag on camera. It also needed to be vibrant.

Nothing fit the bill until Borland saw a United States Postal Service employee walking down the street in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania—where the show taped—and took note of his cardigan. Borland phoned postal supply distributors and was able to secure a fresh inventory of sweaters (which she bought white, and then dyed) that kept Rogers looking like himself through the show’s final episode in 2001.

27. Rogers changed into sneakers as a production practicality.

According to Wagner, Rogers’s decision to change into sneakers for each episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood was a production-related consideration. “His trademark sneakers were born when he found them to be quieter than his dress shoes as he moved about the set,” wrote Wagner.

28. He invited the driver who took him to a PBS dinner to eat with them.

While being transported to a PBS executive's house, Rogers heard his limo driver say that he was going to have to wait outside for two hours while the party dined—so Rogers insisted that the driver join them for dinner.

On the ride back home, Rogers sat in the front of the car with the driver, who mentioned that they were passing his house on their way back to Rogers's home. So Rogers asked if they could stop in to meet the family. According to the driver, it was one of the best nights of his life: Rogers played piano for the family and chatted with them until late into the night.

29. No, Rogers was never a sniper.

The internet has stirred up all sorts of bizarre rumors about Rogers, including one that he served in the army and was a sniper in Vietnam and another that he served in the army and was a sniper in Korea. As exciting as that might make an upcoming biopics, these are both untrue.

30. Rogers was partly responsible for helping to save public television.

In 1969, Rogers—who was relatively unknown at the time—went before the Senate to plead for a $20 million grant for public broadcasting, which had been proposed by President Johnson but was in danger of being sliced in half by Richard Nixon. His passionate plea about how television had the potential to turn kids into productive citizens worked; instead of cutting the budget, funding for public TV increased from $9 million to $22 million.

31. Rogers also helped to save the VCR.

Years after he appeared before the Senate, Rogers also managed to convince the Supreme Court that using VCRs to record TV shows at home shouldn’t be considered a form of copyright infringement. Rogers argued that recording a program like his allowed working parents to sit down with their children and watch shows as a family. Again, he was convincing.

32. At least one professor believes that rogers's impact on kids wasn't all that positive.

LSU professor Don Chance is one of the few people who isn't 100 positive about Rogers's legacy: He believes that Rogers created a, "culture of excessive doting" which resulted in generations of lazy, entitled college students.

33. He was regularly parodied—and loved every second of it.

Rogers was regularly parodied, and he loved it. The first time Eddie Murphy met Mr. Rogers, he couldn't stop himself from giving the guy a big hug.

34. Rogers was colorblind.

Those brightly colored sweaters were a trademark of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, but the colorblind host might not have always noticed. In a 2003 article, just a few days after his passing, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette wrote that:

"Among the forgotten details about Fred Rogers is that he was so colorblind he could not distinguish between tomato soup and pea soup."

35. Michael Keaton got his start on MISTER ROGERS' NEIGHBORHOOD.

Oscar-nominated actor Michael Keaton's first job was as a stagehand on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, manning Picture, Picture, and appearing as Purple Panda.

36. Rogers gave George Romero his first paying gig, too.

It's hard to imagine a gentle, soft-spoken, children's education advocate like Rogers sitting down to enjoy a gory, violent zombie movie like Night of the Living Dead, but it actually aligns perfectly with Rogers's brand of thoughtfulness. He checked out the horror flick to show his support for then-up-and-coming filmmaker George Romero, whose first paying job was with everyone's favorite neighbor.

“Fred was the first guy who trusted me enough to hire me to actually shoot film,” Romero said. As a young man just out of college, Romero honed his filmmaking skills making a series of short segments for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, creating a dozen or so titles such as “How Lightbulbs Are Made” and “Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy.” The zombie king, who passed away in 2017, considered the latter his first big production, shot in a working hospital: “I still joke that 'Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy' is the scariest film I’ve ever made."

37. Rogers paid a visit to Sesame Street in 1981.

Though Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood and Sesame Street were both PBS shows, they were technically competitors—though the show’s producers didn’t exactly act like it. As a result, Rogers made an appearance on Sesame Street in May 1981.

The video opens with Rogers wearing a suit and tie instead of his usual cardigan sweater. He's standing outside of a storefront when Big Bird approaches and asks if he’ll judge a race between him and Snuffy. (The theme of the segment was competition and, more importantly, maintaining friendships whether you win or lose.)

38. He made a guest appearance on Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman, too.

Rogers once played a pastor's mentor on Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman.

39. Many of the characters on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood were named after people in Rogers's life.

McFeely, for example, was Rogers's grandfather's name; Queen Sara was named for Rogers's wife.

40. Rogers got his own stamp in 2018.


USPS

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, the United States Postal Service issued a stamp with Rogers's image on it. On it, Rogers—decked out in one of his trademark colorful cardigans—smiles for the camera alongside King Friday XIII, ruler of the Neighborhood of Make-Believe.

41. He was turned into a Funko Pop!

Also in honor of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood 50th anniversary, the kindest soul to ever grace a television screen was honored with a series of Funko toys, including a Funko Pop! figure.

Ready to learn more about Fred Rogers? Watch the video below, where John Green brings you a whole pile of things you should know about everybody's favorite neighbor.

How Much Are You Spending on Streaming Services? This Handy Calculator Can Tell You

LightFieldStudios/iStock via Getty Images
LightFieldStudios/iStock via Getty Images

With the recent debut of both Disney+ and Apple TV+, not to mention upcoming launches for HBO Max, NBC’s Peacock, and more, streaming services are officially coming for cable television’s throne—and might sneakily empty your bank account while they're at it.

While a monthly fee of $10 to $15 seems easy enough to justify if you’re willing to sacrifice a burrito bowl or fancy cocktail once a month, the little voice in the back of your head is probably whispering, “but it still adds up.” To find out just how much, MarketWatch created a calculator that will not only tell you how much you’re spending on streaming services every month; it’ll also add up the lifetime cost of all those entertainment expenses.

The calculator covers Netflix, CBS All Access, Hulu, Amazon Prime, Sling TV, Disney+, Apple TV+, and YouTube TV, and it also includes a whole host of add-ons that you might not even have realized were available. Through Amazon Prime, for example, you can subscribe to HBO, Showtime, and other premium channels—but there are also more niche options like Hallmark Movies Now and NickHits (with iCarly, The Fairly OddParents, and other Nickelodeon classics).

As you check off services and add-ons, you’ll see your monthly bill on the right side of the total box, and the lifetime cost—which accounts for 50 years of streaming, adjusted for inflation—will balloon before your eyes on the left side. Below that, there’s an even larger number labeled as the lifetime “true” cost, which estimates how much you would’ve made if you had invested that money instead.

For example: If you sign up for basic monthly subscriptions to Netflix and Disney+ for $9 and $7, respectively, your lifetime cost totals around $16,200. However, if you had opted to invest that money, the 50-year prediction sees you walking away with almost $74,000.

Having said that, it’s understandably hard to look that far into the future, especially when Disney+ is tempting you with the Lizzie McGuire series, Star Wars spinoff The Mandalorian, and practically every beloved animated Disney movie from your childhood.

[h/t MarketWatch]

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