New Star Wars Furniture Line Brings Wookies and TIE Fighters Into Your Living Room

Kenneth Cobonpue, Lucasfilm Ltd.
Kenneth Cobonpue, Lucasfilm Ltd.

The Star Wars movies have inspired apparel, action figures, and even office supplies. Ahead of the release of Star Wars Episode IX: Rise of Skywalker later this year, Popular Mechanics reports that Disney has teamed up with famed furniture designer Kenneth Cobonpue to create a new line of Star Wars-themed products for the home.

Cobonpue is a Filipino industrial artist known for incorporating traditional techniques and nature-inspired designs into his work. The new collection he created for Disney Philippines riffs on the vehicles and characters of the Star Wars universe.

The TIE fighter armchair allows sitters to relax in a seat made to look like the signature combat craft of the Imperial army. There are also end tables inspired by the TIE fighters that utilize the same iconic, hexagonal wing design. Some pieces are inspired by beloved characters, like the Chewie rocking stool, which is made from a shaggy brown material and flourished with his signature bandolier. If you think the Dark Side has more style, the line also includes chairs that pay homage to Darth Vader and Darth Sidious.

After originally launching it in the Philippines, Disney made the collection available to U.S. buyers in May. The furniture is for sale in select retailers and showrooms in 11 states.

TIE fighter Star Wars chair.
Kenneth Cobonpue, Lucasfilm Ltd.

Chewie stool inspired by Star Wars.
Kenneth Cobonpue, Lucasfilm Ltd.

TIE fighter end table inspired by Star Wars.
Kenneth Cobonpue, Lucasfilm Ltd.

Darth Vader chair inspired by Star Wars.
Kenneth Cobonpue, Lucasfilm Ltd.

Darth Sidious chair inspired by Star Wars.
Kenneth Cobonpue, Lucasfilm Ltd.

[h/t Popular Mechanics]

You Can Take a Virtual Tour of Fallingwater and More of Frank Lloyd Wright's Most Famous Buildings

Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater in Pennsylvania.
Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater in Pennsylvania.
Daderot, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

If you only know one architect by name, there’s a pretty good chance it’s Frank Lloyd Wright. The 20th-century visionary, whose most famous works include Fallingwater in Pennsylvania and New York’s Guggenheim Museum, ushered American architecture into a modern era that prized simplicity and natural beauty over Victorian ostentation.

Since most of his buildings are closed to visitors right now, the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy, the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and Unity Temple Restoration Foundation are working together to bring the buildings to visitors via virtual tours.

Smithsonian reports that every Thursday at 1 p.m. EST, participating sites will share a new video of a Wright-constructed property across various social media accounts with the hashtag “#WrightVirtualVisits.” Last week, for example, Minneapolis’s Malcolm Willey House shared a video on its Facebook page of the Seth Peterson Cottage in Mirror Lake, Wisconsin. This way, fans who follow a certain building on social media will get to learn about others.

The video tours, hosted by the property owners or directors of Wright-affiliated organizations, cover everything from specific architectural elements, like sloping ceilings and built-in seating, to general themes in Wright’s work, like his commitment to accentuating features of the natural landscape. Some even touch on the process of adding modern technology to the houses; the Willey House, which was built in 1934, was outfitted with air conditioning during the early 21st century (though modern trappings don't necessarily make the houses any easier to sell).

In short, the videos are a great way for newcomers to be introduced to Wright’s legacy and for longtime fans to pick up behind-the-scenes details about his buildings. So far, 17 properties have volunteered to take part in the initiative, including Wright’s own Wisconsin estate, Taliesin, and Fallingwater, a summer residence for department store owner Edgar J. Kaufmann that Wright built on top of a waterfall in the mid-1930s.

You can discover the videos by searching for #WrightVirtualVisits on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, or you can bookmark this page from the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy’s website, which will be updated with new videos as they’re made public.

[h/t Smithsonian]

Can You Spot the Easter Egg Hiding in the Flowers in This Springtime Brain Teaser?

Don't worry—the puzzle below won't trigger your seasonal allergies.
Don't worry—the puzzle below won't trigger your seasonal allergies.
FlairImages/iStock via Getty Images

Scores of residents likely won’t be dashing through vibrant flower gardens at your neighborhood’s traditional Easter egg hunt this year, but you can still put your eagle eye to good use in this brain teaser, courtesy of online blinds retailer 247 Blinds.

In the following image, a single egg is hidden somewhere among the bright pattern of yellow flowers and green leaves. Once you’ve spotted it (or decided to throw in the towel), scroll down to reveal the answer.

spot the egg in the flowers brain teaser
Can you spot the Easter egg?
247 Blinds

The design in the image is the very same one as the online retailer's “Hard to Crack” roller blinds—cleverly concealed egg included—which you can customize to fit most standard windows. Not only will it give your room a sunny, springtime ambience, it’ll also give your house guests something to do while they sip their morning coffee.

Ready to wrap up your virtual Easter egg hunt? The egg is circled in red below.

spot the egg in the flowers brain teaser answer
You've earned a chocolate bunny or two.
247 Blinds

And while you’re waiting for the Easter Bunny to deliver a basket brimming with candy-filled eggs this weekend, find out where the Easter Bunny came from here.

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