The CDC Warns That Just Touching Contaminated Pig Ear Dog Treats Can Make Humans Sick

Chalabala/iStock via Getty Images
Chalabala/iStock via Getty Images

Following concerns this week about a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella tied to pig ear dog treats, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have passed along further clarification. Because the agencies cannot link the outbreak to any one supplier, they advise not to buy or feed any pig ear treats to animals. Just as importantly, they caution humans shouldn’t even be touching them.

According to the CDC, a total of 127 human cases of Salmonella poisoning reported in 33 states have been linked to the dog treats, which are typically dehydrated and intact pig ears—though they may also come from other parts of a swine—that often have added flavoring. By chewing on or consuming the ears, animals can contract Salmonella, the bacteria that causes foodborne illness and prompts symptoms like diarrhea, vomiting, and fever and sometimes requires hospitalization. In pets, symptoms may also include bloody diarrhea and fatigue.

A dog enjoys a pig ear dog treat
Rosalie, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

The CDC and FDA are telling consumers to avoid touching these pig ears altogether because Salmonella can easily be passed from their surface to human hands. If hands are not washed, the bacteria can spread to other surfaces or to a person’s mouth, causing infection. A dog who has just consumed Salmonella and then licks someone’s face or open wound can also pass along the bacteria.

The CDC has examined treats from a variety of suppliers, including some that claim to have been irradiated to kill bacteria. They have yet to isolate the outbreak to a single source. All pig ear treats, regardless of brand, should be discarded and surfaces or containers they’ve touched should be washed with soap and water.

[h/t CNN]

Here’s How to Find Out If Your MacBook Pro Was Just Banned by the FAA

shironosov/iStock via Getty Images
shironosov/iStock via Getty Images

Back in June, Apple issued a recall of approximately 460,000 15-inch MacBook Pro laptops sold between September 2015 and February 2017, stating that “the battery may overheat and pose a fire safety risk.” Now, Bloomberg reports that the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has warned airlines to ban those batteries from flights.

Technically, airlines could have started banning the laptops as soon as Apple issued the recall, since 2016 airline safety instructions mandate that all recalled batteries may not fly as cargo or in carry-on baggage. The FAA has essentially alerted them to the recall and reminded them about the existing rules.

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency banned the laptops in early August, which has been implemented so far by TUI Group Airlines, Thomas Cook Airlines, Air Italy, and Air Transat. Domestic airlines in the U.S. are now following suit, so it’s worth finding out if your laptop battery is part of the recall if you have plans to fly soon. Even if you don’t have any current travel plans, it’s a good opportunity to get your recalled battery replaced—which Apple will do for free.

Fast Company outlines exactly how to check your device: Click the Apple icon in the upper left corner of your screen, and tap “About This Mac.” If you see “MacBook Pro (Retina, 15 inch, Mid 2015)” or a similar description, copy the serial number, and paste it into the box under the “Eligibility” section on this page. If your laptop was affected, scroll down and follow the directions to make an appointment for a replacement battery.

Once your battery is replaced, you’re free to fly with your MacBook; just make sure to bring documentation of your battery replacement to the airport, in case officials ask for proof.

[h/t Bloomberg]

Taco Seasoning Sold at Walmart Has Been Recalled Due to Salmonella Contamination

rez-art/iStock via Getty Images
rez-art/iStock via Getty Images

Consumers who shop at Walmart are being warned to check their pantries. As WFMJ reports, two spice mixes sold by the retail chain—Great Value Mild Taco Seasoning Mix and HEB Taco Seasoning Mix Reduced Sodium—have been recalled due to Salmonella concerns.

Salmonellosis is a food-borne illness caused by Salmonella bacteria. It's normally thought of as spreading through eggs, milk, or meat, but pantry items are also vulnerable to salmonella contamination.

In this case, the potential contamination has been traced back to a single lot of cumin produced by Mincing Spice Co. Both taco seasonings mentioned above contain the spice, and Williams Foods LLC has issued a voluntary recall of the products.

The U.S. is in the middle of a deadly Salmonella outbreak. According to the CDC, 768 people across 48 states have fallen ill with the disease, with 122 patients in the hospital and two dead. These outbreaks have been connected to backyard poultry and pig ear dog treats. So far, no reported cases of salmonellosis have been connected to the recalled taco seasoning.

To heed the precautionary recall, look for items with the below dates and numbers in your kitchen at home:

Great Value Mild Taco Seasoning Mix, 1 oz, Item Number: 564829444, UPC: 0 78742 24572 0, Best if used by 07/08/21, Best if used by 07/09/21

HEB Taco Seasoning Mix Reduced Sodium, 1.25 oz, Item Number: 050215, UPC: 0 41220 79609 0, Better by 07/10/21, Better by 07/11/21, Better by 07/15/21

[h/t WFMJ]

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