17 Amazing Labor Day Sales to Check Out

GeorgeRudy/iStock via Getty Images
GeorgeRudy/iStock via Getty Images

If long holiday weekends put you in a mood to spend, you’re in luck. A number of retailers are promoting Labor Day sales and savings on everything from apparel to books. Take a look at some of the best deals on tap to tide you over until Black Friday.

1. Sears


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Nothing goes together quite like Labor Day sales and appliances, and Sears has you covered with up to 40 percent off on products big and small, like refrigerators, vacuums, and washers. Take a look at the selection here.

2. Ann Taylor

The popular professional-attire store will take 40 percent off full-priced styles with the promo code LASTHURRAH. You can also get an extra 10 percent off full-price tops and sweaters.

3. Article

Enjoy 30 percent off Article’s selection of trend-setting home furniture.

4. Barnes & Noble

The exterior of a Barnes & Noble store in New York City is pictured in January 2019
Drew Angerer, Getty Images

Take 50 percent off select book titles, including hot new releases, classics, and Barnes & Noble Exclusive Editions. (Be sure to pick up a copy of Mental Floss's all-new special print edition while you're there.)

5. Wayfair

Stock up on essential home goods with Wayfair’s clearance sale, which offers up to 75 percent off their closeout inventory.

6. iRobot

Over at iRobot, you can save up to $150 on select Roomba models through September 7.

7. Casper

Rest easier when you take 10 percent off Casper’s line of mattresses. Use the code LABORDAY.

8. Nordstrom

The exterior of a Nordstrom store in New York City is pictured in May 2018
Spencer Platt, Getty Images

Beginning August 30, the apparel retailer will cut prices by up to 40 percent for an end-of-season sale.

9. Osprey

Take 25 percent off select outdoor packs and up to 50 percent off items from last season.

10. Skagen

Save on time at this online retailer. Eye-catching watches start at $49.99.

11. Forsake

Get free two-day UPS shipping on any order placed during Labor Day weekend at this popular footwear shop.

12. Best Buy

The exterior of a Best Buy store in Bruno, California is pictured in November 2015
Justin Sullivan, Getty Images

Save up to 40 percent on select appliance models, including washers and dryers from LG and Whirlpool.

13. Leesa

Get $200 off the Leesa mattress and receive two free pillows along with it.

14. Crate & Barrel

Spruce up your living areas and take 15 to 20 percent off select upholstery furniture.

15. Old Navy


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Take 50 percent off all jeans, dresses, and tees beginning August 29.

16. J.Crew

With the appropriately downtrodden promo code SUNSET, you can wave goodbye to summer by taking 40 percent off your purchase from J.Crew.

17. Amazon

Not to be outdone, Amazon is promoting big deals this Labor Day on TVs from TCL, LG, and Sony.

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

The Kansas Shoe Salesman Responsible for Veterans Day

Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons
Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

The reason we celebrate Veterans Day on November 11th dates back to 1918, when an armistice between the Allies and Germany was signed that essentially ended World War I. The first Armistice Day was celebrated the following November 11th.

World War I was billed as the war to end all wars, but of course it didn't. So by the 1950s, with so many American men and women veterans of World War II and the conflict in Korea, some thought the term "Armistice Day" was outdated.

A new day

There's a shoe salesman from Emporia, Kansas, who probably isn't in many history books, but he deserves at least a paragraph. In the early 1950s, a gentleman by the name of Alvin King thought Armistice Day was too limiting. He had lost family in World War II, and thought all American veterans of all wars should be honored on November 11th. So he formed a committee, and in 1953 the city of Emporia, Kansas, celebrated Veterans Day.

Ed Rees, Emporia's local congressman, loved the idea and took it to Washington. President Eisenhower liked King's idea, too. In 1954, Eisenhower formally changed November 11th to Veterans Day and invited some of Emporia's residents to be there when he signed the bill. King was one of those invited, but there was one problem: he didn't own a nice suit. His veteran friends chipped in and bought him a proper suit and paid his way from Kansas to the White House.

In 2003, Congress passed a resolution declaring Emporia, Kansas to be the founding city of Veterans Day.

This post originally appeared in 2011.

6 Tasty Facts About Scrapple

Kate Hopkins, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Kate Hopkins, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Love it or hate it, scrapple is a way of life—especially if you grew up in Pennsylvania or another Mid-Atlantic state like New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, or Virginia. And this (typically) pork-filled pudding isn’t going anywhere. While its popularity in America dates back more than 150 years, the dish itself is believed to have originated in pre-Roman times. In celebration of National Scrapple Day, here’s everything you ever—or never—wanted to know about the dish.

1. Scrapple is typically made of pig parts. Lots and lots of pig parts.

Though every scrapple manufacturer has its own particular recipe, it all boils down to the same basic process—literally: boiling up a bunch of pig scraps (yes, the parts you don’t want to know are in there) to create a stock which is then mixed with cornmeal, flour, and a handful of spices to create a slurry. Once the consistency is right, chopped pig parts are added in and the mixture is turned into a loaf and baked.

As the dish has gained popularity, chefs have put their own unique spins on it, adding in different meats and spices to play with the flavor. New York City’s Ivan Ramen even cooked it up waffle-style.

2. People were eating scrapple long before it made its way to America.

People often think that the word scrapple derives from scraps, and it’s easy to understand why. But it’s actually an Americanized derivation of panhaskröppel, a German word meaning "slice of rabbit." Much like its modern-day counterpart, skröppel—which dates back to pre-Roman times—was a dish that was designed to make use of every part of its protein (in this case, a rabbit). It was brought to America in the 17th and 18th centuries by German colonists who settled in the Philadelphia area.

In 1863, the first mass-produced version of scrapple arrived via Habbersett, which is still making the product today. They haven’t tweaked the recipe much in the past 150-plus years, though they do offer a beef version as well.

3. If your scrapple is gray, you're a-ok.

A dull gray isn’t normally the most appetizing color you’d want in a meat product, but that’s the color a proper piece of scrapple should be. (It is typically pork bits, after all.)

4. Scrapple can be topped with all kinds of goodies.

Though there’s no rule that says you can’t enjoy a delicious piece of scrapple at any time of day, it’s considered a breakfast meat. As such, it’s often served with (or over) eggs but can be topped with all sorts of condiments; while some people stick with ketchup or jelly, others go wild with applesauce, mustard, maple syrup, and honey to make the most of the sweet-and-salty flavor combo. There’s also nothing wrong with being a scrapple purist and eating it as is.

5. Dogfish Head made a scrapple beer.

The master brewers at Delaware’s Dogfish Head have never been afraid to get experimental with their flavors. In 2014, they created a Beer for Breakfast Stout that was brewed with Rapa pork scrapple. A representative for the scrapple brand called the collaboration a "unique proposition." Indeed.

6. Delaware holds an annual scrapple festival each October.

Speaking of Delaware: It’s also home to the country’s oldest—and largest—annual scrapple festival. Originating in 1992, the Apple Scrapple Festival in Bridgeville, Delaware is a yearly celebration of all things pig parts, which includes events like a ladies skillet toss and a scrapple chunkin’ contest. More than 25,000 attendees make the trek annually.

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